Rachel Botsman: Building Trust In An Age of Distrust, Episode #23

The ability to build trust is a vital skill in our day in age. Institutions are viewed with skepticism and mistrust by the majority of people, and that is not only talking about banks and educational establishments. Facebook, Google, and many other large corporations are viewed with the same kind of pessimism. My guest today is Rachel Botsman, an accomplished author who has studied the issue of trust in depth and has some incredibly valuable advice for those who are seeking to build trust in an age of distrust. Listen to this episode to hear what she has to share. You will find that trust is at the bottom of every good or successful relationship.

Is technology helping us to place our trust in worthy places and people?

A casual look at the way people sign up for social media platforms and software packages these days might convince you that people are very trusting. For example, when is the last time you read every word of the terms of service on one of those websites? Probably never. But does that mean that you inherently trust those who own and operate the website? Rachel Botsman says that much more is going on than simple trust and distrust. There is a myriad of complicated emotion and thought that governs the way we give and receive trust. On this episode, she unpacks some of the detail behind those things to help us understand how those of us who are leading companies and organizations can build trust instead of destroying it.

Building trust is a skill every leader must have

Leadership is built on trust. It’s hard to be at the forefront of any movement or cause and expect people to follow you without it. Rachel Botsman says that leaders especially need to learn how to foster trust within their organizations or companies. A company culture that is powerful is a company culture where individuals have learned how to trust each other. Listen to this conversation as Rachel explains practical steps leaders can take to improve their ability to build trust with those they lead and those they serve alongside. These are powerful principles every leader must know.

Is there a difference between building trust internally within a company and externally with customers?

One of the things about trust that I was fascinated by as I spoke with Rachel is that trust in various contexts is built in different ways. For example, I asked her if there is any difference between how a leader would build trust with those internally, within their institution or company, and with those external to the company, such as customers. She says there is definitely a difference and those differences depend on things too numerous to mention in a short paragraph like this. Be sure you listen to this episode to find out how you can increase your leadership and trustworthiness with those you lead and with those you serve.

A trust crisis is occurring and you can be part of the solution

It is ironic when you think about the realities of the world we live in. Millions have lost faith in institutions and leaders but countless other millions of people rent their homes to total strangers, exchange currencies digitally, and even trust artificial intelligence in the form of messenger Bots. It’s what is often called “distributed trust” and is becoming more and more prevalent as technologies increase. By understanding exactly how trust is built, how you can better manage trust, and how trust is broken and repaired in the digital age, you will be better equipped to be part of the solution rather than more of the problem. Listen to this episode to find out more.

Outline of This Episode

  • [2:03] Leadership is when people have the ability to mobilize others
  • [4:24] Rachel’s fascination with “trust” and why she wrote her book
  • [9:08] How the trust shift is impacting institutions and what they should do about it
  • [12:10] Advice for leaders in an age when trust is hard to come by
  • [14:57] Building trust internally in a company VS externally
  • [17:23] Advice for those who are looking for trustworthy people for their team
  • [19:10] Rachel’s definition of trust

Resources & People Mentioned

Connect with Erica

Erica@cotentialgroup.com

Linkedin.com/in/ericadhawan

Twitter.com/edhawan

Facebook.com/ericadhawan

Tweets

Dr. David Burkus: Understanding And Making The Most of Your Personal Network, Episode #22

Anytime we begin to talk about a personal network, there are people in the conversation who break out in a cold sweat. That’s because they have been given advice about networking and tried to apply it and the results were less than stellar. In fact, many of us have very sour taste in our mouths because of the miserable networking advice we’ve tried to apply. My guest on this episode of the podcast, Dr. David Burkus has written a new book entitled, “Friend of a Friend.” It’s his remarkable attempt to examine the actual research that exists about how networks actually work. It’s not a collection of anecdotes crammed into short chapters of pithy advice, it is actual data that explains how networks operate and debunks the myths about personal networks many of us believe. Listen to this fascinating conversation and you will learn how to make better use of your personal network.

Why you need to understand the network you are actually in and act accordingly

Most of the books you read or advice you hear about the topic of networking are based on first-hand accounts and experiences. My guest today, Dr. David Burkus points out that that is a dataset of one. It’s not a very reliable source of knowing what is normally true in most cases. He suggests that we look at the actual research that’s been done about how personal networks operate to better understand best practices. He says understanding networks is not the issue, but understanding the actual network you are a part of is the real key. In our conversation, he outlines some of the things you need to consider about your personal network in order to make the best decisions about how you should interact with people within it. It’s a valuable conversation you won’t want to miss.

Do you know how to make your personal network work for you AND for others?

We often think of networking from the perspective of what we can get out of it. Surely, there is an aspect in which we want to benefit from the relationships we invest in, but that benefit usually comes from being a giver, not a taker. David Burkus explains that it is important for us to take the time to understand our network in all of its intricacies and nuances so that we can better respond to the people we correspond with and know – in ways that actually benefit them and us at the same time. You’ll find out how David recommends you do that, on this episode.

What are the best-practices to effectively leverage your digital network connections?

One of the promises that social media made in its beginning days was that we would be able to build our personal networks faster and more deeply as a result of using social media. David Burkus says that is only partly true. We are able to carry on conversations and discover things about the people with internet with through social media, but very seldom does that interaction take the place of real, face-to-face relationships. David explains how we can make good use of social media to build existing relationships and why it’s often necessary to organize face-to-face meetings in addition to the social media interactions we have on a day-to-day basis.

Networking tip: Don’t ask a friend for an introduction to one of their friends

One of the things I was curious to receive David’s thoughts about was how he recommends a person should go about asking for an introduction from one of their friends. His answer: Don’t. In David’s view, that approach puts the friend in a position that is uncomfortable for them at the least and potentially dangerous to their relationship with the person you want the introduction to, at the worst. He has a better idea: inquire broadly throughout your network for people who specialize in the areas you’re focused on at that time. The responses you get will be generous, eager, and much more helpful than pursuing the one person you think you really need to meet. David has a great deal of practical advice like this to share, all based on research. You can hear it on this episode.

Outline of This Episode

  • [0:47] What David believes about when a person becomes a leader
  • [2:54] The reasons David wrote his book: a fascination with network science
  • [7:25] Key questions to ask yourself to make your network work for you
  • [11:54] Digital networking: Best-practices to effectively leverage it
  • [14:33] Do stylistic choices we make in digital communication matter to your network?
  • [18:55] The highlights David feels are most important in his book
  • [21:40] Advice for those who want to become smart networkers
  • [25:02] What’s the best way to ask a friend for an introduction to one of their friends?

Resources & People Mentioned

Connect with Erica

Erica@cotentialgroup.com

Linkedin.com/in/ericadhawan

Twitter.com/edhawan

Facebook.com/ericadhawan

Tweets

Dr. Naomi Baron: Maximizing and Using Digital Communication Skills In Leadership, Episode #21

Digital communication skills are something every leader in this day and age need to not only learn but master. The digital nature of the way we communicate has brought a number of challenges with it that we need to understand and address effectively. Dr. Naomi Baron was invited to be my guest on this episode simply because her expertise in the realm of communication makes her a wonderful person to educate leaders about the new forms of communication that exist, how they are being used, and how the relationship between language and leadership can be maximized in the digital age. Dr. Baron is a former Guggenheim Fellow, Fulbright Fellow, and Visiting Scholar at the Stanford Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and has published eight books.

Leadership is about how we use language

Leadership is definitely about influence, but how does that influence primarily take place? The only way influence can really take place is through communication, either verbal or non-verbal. That is one of the things Dr. Baron intimates when she says that leadership is really about how we use language. Influence cannot be effectively exerted without skill at communicating things like vision, processes, strategies, and more. Join me for this conversation with Dr. Baron as she shares extensively from her own research and the research of others about how communication in the digital age is changing the way leaders need to relate to the people they lead.

Leaders of digital teams should remember this maxim: “Less haste = more speed”

The rapid pace at which communication happens via digital means pushes all of us into a mindset where immediate responses and multitasking seem to be mandatory. But Dr. Baron points out that when we don’t take the time to proofread what we key into a device, which often happens with texting and messaging, we actually make more work for ourselves and waste energy and time in the communication. She advises that leaders of digital teams develop the digital communication skill of patient and careful responses. This will enable them to avoid the re-dos necessary to make up for mistakes that were made through haste. Insights like this are one of the reasons I was eager to have Dr. Baron on the show. Please take the time to listen to this episode. You will learn a great deal about the need for better digital communication skills and how to develop them.

Leaders of teams need to set communication standards and model them

For the sake of effectiveness and efficiency in the workplace, it is imperative that leaders of teams clearly set expectations around the use of digital communication. Team members need to know what forms of communication are important and accepted, and what time frames are expected in relation to communication with team members and customers or clients. But in addition, Dr. Baron points out that leaders need to model those standards just as much as they need to create them. Demonstration of good practices is one of the key ways that anyone in a position of authority is able to communicate the importance and practicality of the standard that has been set forth. If you are a leader, have you established standards for your team’s digital communication practices? If so, are you demonstrating them in your own behavior?

There is incredible power in a prompt digital thank you

As Dr. Baron and I wrapped up our conversation she shared one of the most powerful lessons she has learned about the use of digital communication. Anyone can send an email to say thank you, but the speed with which a person is able to do it communicates volumes about their intentionality in the relationship. Dr. Baron shares a few examples where she was thanked via email or text for something she had done, within hours of having done it. The immediacy of the gesture is what impressed her most and gave her a very positive and favorable impression of the person on the other end of the communication. She points out that if the thank you had come weeks later, it would not have meant so much to her and she would not have the same impression of the person. This is a lesson leaders can apply immediately. The mindfulness to be quick with thanks or appreciation can go a long way toward building relationships that last and fuel our success.

Outline of This Episode

  • [1:22] Dr. Baron’s idea of what leadership really is and how communication figures into it
  • [3:50] Is there a difference between onscreen and offscreen reading?
  • [8:32] Do newfound forms of communication impact HOW we communicate?
  • [13:36] The most common communication challenges, including in digital communication
  • [19:50] Dr. Baron’s view of the similarities and differences between how genders communicate
  • [28:15] What has changed in communication because of devices?
  • [38:55] What questions should leaders be asking to better lead digital teams?
  • [42:20] Does digital communication differ depending on work hierarchy?
  • [47:30] The incredible power of a prompt digital thank-you

Resources & People Mentioned

Connect with Erica

Erica@cotentialgroup.com

Linkedin.com/in/ericadhawan

Twitter.com/edhawan

Facebook.com/ericadhawan

Tweets

Scott Gerber: How Super Connectors Add Value To Every Relationship, Episode #20

We are all familiar with the concept of networking but Scott Gerber says that Super Connectors are people who apply the intention of networking in a way that goes beyond business and personal profit. Whether or not you are a Super Connector has nothing to do with being extroverted or introverted and it has nothing to do with whether you are skilled at particular networking techniques or not. Scott says that Super Connectors are people who approach everything from a generous, particularly human way. If you’ll take the time to listen to the things Scott shares on this episode you won’t hear tips and tricks to improve your ability to connect, you’ll come away challenged to be a better connector at the core of your being.

Super Connectors innately look at the world through habitually generous lenses

It’s fun to do a favor for another person. The fulfillment that comes from seeing the look of gratitude and delight in their eyes is indescribable. Scott says that Super Connectors not only like to do favors for others, they are looking for the opportunity to do favors in every interaction. It’s their habitual way of looking at the world and it saturates every interaction they have. In this episode, Scott shares a number of stories that demonstrate the type of actions that flow out of a Super Connector’s desire to be generous. From video introductions to powerful follow-up, you’ll hear many ideas about how you can adopt the attitudes and behaviors of a Super Connector.

Networker VS Connector: What’s the real difference?

The stereotypical idea of a “networker” is a glad-handing, loud, hard-charging individual who is seen pushing their business card into the hands of everyone they meet. The motive behind the networker’s outgoing approach is to drum up business, plain and simple. They embody a “What’s in it for me?” approach. Scott says that a Connector is motivated by an entirely different set of values. He/she is eager to learn about others, discover how they can help them, and connect the dots between them and others in their sphere of influence. A Super Connector believes that helping others is good for everyone involved and it should be done expecting nothing in return. That’s quite a bit different from the typical networker, don’t you think? And the amazing thing is that the results that come from it are better and longer-lasting. Scott has lots more to share on this episode so do yourself the favor of making time to listen.

Those who are Super Connectors think and act in a particularly human way

A common question these days is whether or not there’s a certain way people should behave or interact online versus how they interact with others in person. Scott Gerber thinks making those types of distinctions is laughable. He can’t imagine why a person would even want to have two different personas – one in-person and one digital. His best advice in every context is to be yourself and think about adding value to the people around you. In this conversation Scott provides a number of examples of people who do connections right. They approach relationships in an authentic way that Scott calls, “particularly human.” Are you like one of the Super Connectors Scott describes? Find out on this episode.

The number one reason people fail in establishing long-lasting connections

Toward the end of my conversation with Scott, he spoke about the importance of follow up. What he means by the term is the act of intentionally reconnecting with someone you’ve met or been introduced to. He says that the number one reason people fail in establishing long-lasting, beneficial relationships is that they don’t follow up. If it’s that important, it makes sense to learn how to do it right, doesn’t it? In this episode Scott shares some of the practices Super Connectors employ to follow up diligently and effectively and he points out how you can learn more from a particular chapter in his book, “Super Connectors,” so be sure you listen to learn how to establish your own follow up habits.

Outline of This Episode

  • [1:35] Scott’s definition of Leadership
  • [2:20] Reshaping the definition of connecting and networking
  • [5:02] An explanation of what Super Connectors are really like
  • [9:40] Online relationships from a Super Connector’s perspective
  • [15:51] Corporate connectors compared to entrepreneurial connectors
  • [20:06] Why super connecting can be done in everyday things by everyday people
  • [22:10] The unique challenges Super Connector’s face, and Scott’s advice to them
  • [27:09] A very tactical approach to checking yourself as a connector
  • [30:08] The number one reason people fail at relationships: They fail to follow up

Resources & People Mentioned

Connect with Erica

Erica@cotentialgroup.com

Linkedin.com/in/ericadhawan

Twitter.com/edhawan

Facebook.com/ericadhawan

Tweets

Dr. Deborah Tannen: Modern Communication Challenges In Work And Life, Episode #19

Modern communication is a far cry from what we experienced even 10 years ago. As my guest, Dr. Deborah Tannen has noted, we’ve gone from a default state of consciousness that was one of solitude, to a default state of consciousness that is one of always-on engagement. Dr. Tannen is doing important work, of which every leader should take note. As communication methods and styles change it’s important to realize that the effectiveness of our leadership will largely depend on how effectively we leaders are able to navigate the new styles and ways of communication. Join me in this conversation with Dr. Tannen to hear how modern communication is working and not working in the 21st century.

What conclusions are people making about you by the things you’re saying and the way you’re saying them?

Communication has never been a simple matter of stating what you mean, having the other person receive it as you mean it, and moving on in harmony. There are myriad places along the way that the simplest of communications can be misspoken, misunderstood, and misinterpreted. An important thing Dr. Tannen mentioned in our conversation is that people are not only listening to you in order to understand the information coming out of your mouth. They are also assessing you as an individual and making conclusions about you by the way you speak and the things you say. But you’re not doomed to the fickleness of other people’s perceptions. There are tangible things you can do to make yourself better understood and better perceived by others. Be sure you listen to this episode to hear Dr. Tannen’s tips.

FOMO and FOBLO impact the ways we communicate – and social media exacerbates the problem

Are you familiar with the terms Dr. Tannen has coined: “FOMO” and “FOBLO?” The acronyms stand for “Fear of missing out” and “Fear of being left out.” Both are elements of modern communication that have more to do with the things going on outside a conversation. In this interview, Dr. Tannen provides a handful of very practical examples of how our modern, digital communication makes the fear of being left out and the fear of missing out even worse for some individuals, and more importantly, gives suggestions for how we can better manage our own fears in these areas so that we can communicate more deeply and authentically.

The “double bind” women often find themselves in at the workplace

A prominent area where Dr. Tannen has spent a great deal of time is in regard to the particular communication needs, styles, and habits of women. She’s discovered that women in the workplace often find themselves in what she refers to as a “double bind.” A double bind is when two things are required of an individual and the successful accomplishment of one of them makes the other impossible. How does this happen to women in the workplace? Dr. Tannen explains with great insight on this episode, so be sure you listen.

The 2 dynamics that are happening in every conversation, digital or in person

In every conversation, whether it happens in-person or digitally, two things are almost always going on in the minds of those involved. These two things also weigh in at varying levels of importance depending on whether men or women are involved in the conversation. These two things are both questions: “Who is on top in the relationship?” and “How close are we?” Can you guess which of the two is more likely to be the consideration of women and which is more likely to be the consideration for men? On a more practical level, do you know how keeping those questions in mind can help you become a more effective communicator? Dr. Tannen’s work has given her many insights into modern communication issues like these, so be sure you listen to hear her share them.

Outline of This Episode

  • [0:45] Who is Dr. Deborah Tannen?
  • [1:49] Why Dr. Tannen was interested enough in the relationships of women to write a book about it
  • [6:12] The unspoken scale women tend to put themselves on when judging the depth of their relationships
  • [12:02] How the world of social media provokes anxiety in new ways
  • [16:10] The way women in the workplace often find themselves in a “double bind”
  • [21:21] How does dominance play out in a digital world?
  • [25:19] Managing apologies, showing gratitude, and doing it in person and from a distance
  • [28:57] Advice for those with bosses who have poor digital communication skills
  • [33:05] The impact of disruption: perceptions and realities
  • [37:15] Authenticity in communication is often motivated by concern for those listening
  • [40:38] What’s next for Dr. Tannen and what new rules do we need to think about?

Resources & People Mentioned

Connect with Erica

Erica@cotentialgroup.com

Linkedin.com/in/ericadhawan

Twitter.com/edhawan

Tweets

Claudia Chan: How To Make a Social Impact and Affect Positive Change, Episode #17

Claudia Chan is one of those rare individuals who makes a social impact and everything she does. She is a sterling example of a woman who is taking her life seriously both on a personal level and in the broader ways she is leaving a mark on the world. Claudia is a recognized expert on leadership and a social entrepreneur who is dedicated to empowering individuals and organizations to effect change in the world. One of the areas she focuses on significantly is the area of gender equality. In this conversation, you will hear us discuss why she wrote her most recent book, “How We Rise,” how she balances her personal and public life, and why she believes this is the time for many people to rise up and make an impact on the world for good.

Women: Recognize the influence you could have, where you are. Make a social impact

With a person like Claudia Chan as my guest, I didn’t want to waste the opportunity of discovering what advice she has for women in this day and age. The challenges and disappointments of 2017 place us in a unique time in history and Claudia is not one to shrink back from the challenges. She says that women need to recognize the influence they can have when it comes to making a positive change in the world. That influence doesn’t have to happen only through large corporations and high-profile platforms, it happens right where you are every day. You can hear Claudia’s full explanation of what she means, on this episode.

Do you know your social purpose? What impact will you make?

One of the things Claudia said in this conversation that stuck out to me was that we often hear people talking about discovering their life purpose… but she believes that trying to discover your life purpose is entirely too broad. It’s a pursuit that leads to a great deal of confusion rather than clarity. She believes that we all have many purposes – personal, work, social, and many more. Her most recent focus has been in challenging people to consider their social purpose. What is the social impact they determine to make on the world through the limited amount of time that they have on the planet? Answering that question is one of the best ways to become an instrument of change and an inspiration to others. Listen to Claudia’s ideas about becoming the change you want to see, on this episode.

Leave your life for the world: Contribute more than you extract

We live in a consumer-oriented society. It seems that everyone is out to get whatever they can for themselves. Claudia Chan is encouraging people everywhere to think on a different level, according to a different perspective. What would it mean for you to leave your life for the world, to contribute more than you extract? Claudia says that if more of us ask that question and consider seriously how we could give back, the world would change in short order. I find myself inspired to think bigger and take bigger steps toward change when I talk with Claudia, and I believe you will be in spired too as you listen to what she has to share.

How big companies can massively accelerate gender equality

One of the areas of inequality that has plagued American Society for hundreds of years is in the area of gender. Women’s rights have come a long way but there are still many injustices and wrong attitudes that exist. Claudia Chan believes that big companies can massively accelerate the cause of gender equality through taking the issue seriously, implementing company-wide initiatives that provide opportunity and encourage advancement for women, and level the playing field every place they find inequity. Claudia’s ideas are not only challenging, they are shaping the conversation in many significant ways. You need to hear the important things this dynamic woman has to share, and you can on this episode.

Outline of This Episode

  • [1:22] Leadership: Moving something from there to there in order to produce positive change
  • [3:15] Why Claudia wrote her new book, “This Is How We Rise”
  • [6:08] The desire to live in alignment with purpose and meaning
  • [7:39] How 2018 looks for gender equality impact and growth
  • [12:58] Claudia’s advice for women in corporate America
  • [15:55] Tips for becoming a changemaker who helps us all to rise

Resources & People Mentioned

Connect with Erica

Erica@cotentialgroup.com

Linkedin.com/in/ericadhawan

Twitter.com/edhawan

Facebook.com/ericadhawan

Tweets

Ana Dutra: How To Detox The Workplace From Its LeadershiT, Episode 16

Every person pursuing a career has run into a work environment that was less than ideal, you might even say they were toxic. Ana Dutra Has put together her observations about toxic workplaces in her new book, Lessons in LeadershiT – no, that’s not a typo. the lessons she has learned and her incredible ability to communicate them provide tremendous insight to those of us who are looking to create healthier environments for ourselves in the teams we lead. I invite you to listen to this conversation I was able to have with her about her book and the many the lessons it contains. You won’t regret making the time to listen.

Every workplace has its archetypical team members. In view of the archetypes, what can be done to make a toxic workplace more healthy? Ana Dutra explains

One of the things I love about Ana’s new book, Lessons in LeadershiT: Detoxing the Workplace is that she describes a series of archetypes that represent the various types of team members that typically exist in any organization. The way she uses language to express the variety of difficulties every team of professionals experiences it’s helpful in pulling back the curtain on our own tendencies so that we can take a long hard look at what is beneath the surface and make the adjustments needed to contribute to a healthier work environment. You will enjoy hearing her descriptions of those archetypes as well as the opportunity to consider which one might represent you. Please take the time to listen to this great episode.

Being a leader is about knowing how to deal with the LeadershiT that happens in a toxic workplace

There is always going to be toxicity and problems in any environment where people are working together. It is the leader’s job to address those issues effectively so that the environment can become healthy and the team can work together successfully. Ana Dutra points out that being a leader is about knowing how to deal with those kinds of situations, not run away from them. She gives some great advice on how leaders can do that as wellas gives tips about the kinds of things they need to be aware of as they address the contributors to a toxic work environment. It’s all on this episode.

Ana Dutra’s perspective on why 2017 was a year full of LeadershiT issues, and what she thinks is coming in 2018

It seems that 2017 was a year filled with scandals surrounding leadership both in politics and in companies across the globe. I was curious how Ana Dutra perceives what happened in 2017 and how she thinks leadership is changing in light of those things. Her honest answer was surprising; she doesn’t think the things that happened in 2017 are anything new, the only thing that was new was that they were dragged out into the light and people were able to stand up and say “no more.” You can hear the advice Ana provides regarding how to undo the damage of poor leadership and steer a work team in a different direction, on this episode.

Ana Dutra gives advice on how leaders can reduce their LeadershiT behaviors and become truly empowering leaders

Leaders need to understand that their approach to ridding their team culture of toxic elements begins with them. They first need to look inside and be sure to put themselves under the magnifying glass to make improvements where they are needed. But they also need to demonstrate a willingness to be in uncomfortable places for the sake of their personal growth. Toxic workplaces don’t improve accidentally, leaders have to pave the way, partly by their own example. Ana Dutra explains how to take steps in that direction, on this episode of the podcast.

Outline of This Episode

  • [0:47] Ana’s thoughts about what it means to be a leader
  • [3:00] The reason Ana wrote her book and why she gave it such a provocative title
  • [12:06] The LeadershiT of 2017 – is it new or the same old thing?
  • [14:21] How Leadership has changed in view of technology
  • [16:58] Ana’s tips for reducing our potential LeadershiT behaviors

Resources & People Mentioned

Connect with Erica

Erica@cotentialgroup.com

Linkedin.com/in/ericadhawan

Twitter.com/edhawan

Facebook.com/ericadhawan

Liz Wiseman: The Power of Multiplication In Leadership, Episode 15

The Power of Multiplication is something most leaders are not even aware of, but my guest on this episode – Liz Wiseman – has literally written the book on the subject. Her work introduces the concept of multipliers VS diminishers, particularly as they relate to leadership roles in organizations. Her belief is that the leaders who learn how to maximize the power of multiplication are the leaders who lead happy, successful, energized teams. Listen to our conversation to hear the subtle but powerful differences leaders who are multipliers make.

Diminishers tend to give directions whereas multipliers tend to define possibilities. Which kind of leader do you want to be?

There is so much literature that exists about leadership and everyone who takes their role as a leader seriously tends to be a student of it. Liz Wiseman’s work about leaders who are multipliers is revolutionary in that it helps leaders adapt to the technological and cultural changes that are impacting the way leadership happens. You don’t want to forge ahead based on your old concepts of leadership without seriously considering what Liz has discovered. Your leadership and your teams will be exponentially better as you apply what she shares.

Leaders who are multipliers get more performance out of those who they lead – up to 95% more. That’s why wise leaders learn to be multipliers

When Liz Wiseman talks about leaders being multipliers – what is she really saying? It’s the idea that leaders in the modern age need to effectively draw out the insights and talents of the people on their teams to multiply the resources and potential the organization can experience. This leads to greater achievement all around. The opposite type of leader is what she calls a diminisher, a leader who actually decreases the amount of contribution and impact the individual members of the team have in the organization. It’s clear which one you want to be, but do you know how? Liz explains and gives some of the most practical tips you could ask for, on this episode.

Leaders who insist on being the superstar cause their teams to be apathetic and turn the culture toxic. Here’s how to ensure you do exactly the opposite

We’ve all known leaders who can’t share credit, have to be the ones to come up with all the ideas, and make those who attempt to contribute feel sorry that they did. Liz Wiseman calls that kind of leader a diminisher, a person who keeps themselves at the top of the pecking order despite the skills and expertise of their team members. The results of that kind of leadership are truly toxic. Find out how Liz suggests any leader can become a multiplier and adapt their leadership style to produce a healthy team environment and productive working relationships, on this episode.

Gone are the days when a single leader can know what it takes to lead a team successfully. Collaboration is needed and leaders have to ask the right questions

Due to the faster pace of business spawned by technological advances no leader can expect to be the source of all wisdom and answers for a working team. Collaboration is the word of the day, and good leaders need to know how to ask the right questions to bring out the insight and skill their team brings to the table. In this episode of Masters of Leadership, my guest Liz Wiseman shares three powerful and practical tips any leader can use to improve their team’s collaboration and set them up for greater success. You can’t help but benefit from suggestions as great as these.

Outline of This Episode

  • [1:11] The definition of leadership Liz has adopted (from Jim Collins)
  • [4:38] The difference between leaders who multiply VS those who diminish
  • [15:15] Why it’s harder to be a multiplying leader in a virtual work world
  • [21:58] Liz’ tips for leaders who want to become better multipliers

Resources & People Mentioned

Connect with Erica

Erica@cotentialgroup.com

Linkedin.com/in/ericadhawan

Twitter.com/edhawan

Facebook.com/ericadhawan

Michael Bungay Stanier: Leadership Growth Through Becoming More Coachlike, Episode 14

Everyone who is in a management or leadership position within a company is interested in maximizing their leadership growth. Michael Bungay Stanier says that one of the fastest and most effective ways to do that is by becoming more coachlike. It’s his belief that if leaders can learn to deal with their team members and subordinates from the perspective of a coach they will be able to lead them more effectively, motivate them more powerfully, and keep the team dynamics healthy and strong. This conversation is full of insight that I hope you will take time to here.

A much-needed leadership behavior: Stay curious longer and give advice and coaching more slowly

Leadership growth is not something that happens by accident. Those in positions of leadership need to be intentional about modifying their thinking and behavior when it comes to the way they lead. Michael Bungay Stanier says that there are many behaviors that leaders need to modify for greater results and one of the most important is that they need to learn how to stay curious longer and give their advice and answers more slowly. This allows time for team members to think on their own and respond with possible solutions and benefits that would otherwise be missed if the leader kept talking. This simple tip alone and the way Michael explains it is worth the time it will take you to listen.

Most leaders think they don’t have time to add coaching to their present role – and they are right

Most leaders believe they don’t have time to add coaching to their already busy roles, and they are right. Michael Bungay Stanier says they don’t need to add coaching to the role, they just need to learn to be more coachlike. He and the team at Box of Crayons aim to help business leaders ensure that the activities they are already engaged in are infused with a coach like attitude and approach. The simple, moment by moment interactions that happen every day are the places that good coaching occurs. Michael has tremendous insight about this and I enjoyed hearing him expand on what he’s learned. I’m confident you will too.

Leaders should not be the ones to solve all the problems and provide all the solutions. They should be developing the problem-solving skills of their team

No leader in her right mind should be creating a team that is dependent on her for all of the answers. That sets up the team for failure and creates a culture that breeds frustration. Great leaders are all about equipping, empowering the people on the team to think and problem-solve on their own, which elevates the success of the entire team. Michael Bungay Stanier works with business leaders to teach them the coaching skills that will enable exactly that. His insights are valuable and he shares plenty of them on this episode, so make sure you listen.

When leaders truly get the gist of what it means to be more coachlike in how they lead, the natural question that comes up is “What’s in it for me?”

Being more coachlike as a leader is both about the way you think and the way you interact with the people on your team. One of the greatest benefits of learning these methods of leadership is that they enable you to work less but have more impact through the work you do. You are able to see your interactions with your team pay off to a greater degree and watch their success levels rise. It’s what every leader wants to see, but not everyone understands that the way to do it is to interact with the team in the way a good coach would. Find out more from my guest on this episode, Michael Bungay Stanier.

Outline of This Episode

  • [1:34] Why Michael doesn’t have a snappy definition of leadership
  • [7:45] The work Michael’s team is doing at Box of Crayons
  • [11:05] The greatest challenges for leaders and managers who are learning to coach
  • [14:06] Changes that have happened in coaching and how it’s impacting leadership
  • [19:23] Does coaching within a team work at a distance when team is distributed?
  • [22:10] Michael’s tips to help listeners do more great work

Resources & People Mentioned

Connect with Erica

Erica@cotentialgroup.com

Linkedin.com/in/ericadhawan

Twitter.com/edhawan

Facebook.com/ericadhawan

Tweets

Cy Wakeman: Ditching Drama At Work Through Great Leadership, Episode 13

Drama at work is one of the most deflating and demoralizing things most of us deal with in our careers. Hurtful words and implications combined with outright misunderstandings are enough to scar anyone if we let them. My guest on this episode, Cy Wakeman is an expert at destroying drama in the workplace and she has learned to do so by teaching leaders to empower their teams to practice self-reflection and improve their own mental processes. This conversation is far-ranging and very insightful so make sure you take the time to listen.

Good leadership is about eliminating emotional waste (drama) from the workplace through good mental processes

I love to discover how my guests define the idea of leadership and every one of them has a slightly different take on it. But my guest on this episode, Cy Wakeman has an entirely different definition than most people. She says that good leadership is about eliminating emotional waste, which is what she calls drama, through good mental processes. That means leaders have the job of teaching their teams how to think about situations in an objective, nonassuming way that empowers everyone on the team to deal with reality rather than making up stories about it based on what they feel or presume. This episode is sure to give you the insights you need to improve your leadership and create a healthier environment for your team.

The average person spends 2 ½ hours per day engaged in drama at their workplace. There’s no greater potential for ROI on leadership

It’s hard to believe but modern research demonstrates that the average person spends two and a half hours per day engaged in some kind of drama at the workplace. That is a tremendous loss of creative and intellectual energy – energy that leaders are on the hook to redeem. There is no greater potential for return on investment when it comes to leadership. Cy Wakeman has become a drama researcher almost by accident, learning what it takes to dispel drama in the workplace and put teams on a more productive and collaborative footing. Every leader needs to hear what she has to share about this important topic.

Leaders need to stop encouraging venting and start encouraging greatness through questions aimed at self-reflection

As Cy Wakeman and I talked about the issue of drama in the workplace she pointed out that company spending for learning and training has increased while the level of actual engagement between employees has decreased. She concludes that what we are teaching our teams and leaders is not working, in fact, it’s making the problem of drama at work even worse. She says that leaders need to stop encouraging their employees to vent, which only amplifies their already skewed perspectives, and start encouraging them to aim for greatness through doing the self-reflection required to come to interactions ready to hear and speak the truth. You don’t want to miss the insights that Cy has to share with us on this episode.

Drama and suffering happen because of the story we tell ourselves about reality, not because of reality itself

There is a great deal of suffering in the world, but only a small portion of it is outside our control. That is what my guest, Cy Wakeman would say because she believes that most suffering and pain comes from our interpretation of reality, from the story we tell ourselves, rather than from the facts of reality itself. She believes if we can establish good mental processes that enable us to see reality as it is and stop making up stories about it, we will find that our suffering and pain decrease proportionally. I invite you to learn more about ditching drama at work from my expert on this episode, Cy Wakeman.

Outline of This Episode

  • [0:48] Who is Cy Wakeman and how does she help people ditch the drama and turn excuses into results?
  • [1:43] Cy’s definition of leadership: Eliminating emotional waste from the workplace with good mental processes
  • [2:34] The research and insights that prompted Cy to write her newest book
  • [4:30] Examples of how drama shows up in the workplace and how leaders can ditch it to get to better results
  • [9:09] How drama plays out in the 21st century team context and how leaders can address it
  • [12:59] It’s more important than ever that each team member come to relationships with few assumptions and conclusions
  • [17:09] Modern leadership is teaching people to engage in drama instead of how to avoid it
  • [19:21] Cy’s tips for those who want to become a Masters of Leadership

Resources & People Mentioned

Connect with Erica

Erica@cotentialgroup.com

Linkedin.com/in/ericadhawan

Twitter.com/edhawan

Facebook.com/ericadhawan